Seeing is Believing

Yesterday I got to hold $6000-$9000 (estimate, they’re up for auction soon) worth of art by one of my favorite artists. I was able to pick up a cast bronze bust by Egon Schiele and feel with my own thumbs how he would’ve built up the form in the original clay, gently but decidedly pressed in two lumps of clay to create the eyes with just enough detail for your brain to know exactly what they represent. I was allowed to lift up the protective matting on one of his smaller drawings and closely inspect the linework that I’ve only seen reproduced online or in my art history books.

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Naomi Okubo and Self-Esteem

Recently I began volunteering as a “gallery babysitter” at a tiny space in the middle of the Essex Street Market in NYC. When I first wandered in to see the space, I was ecstatic to see one of the contemporary artists they’re currently featuring has been a favorite of mine for some time.

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August Monthly Gallery Review- Eden Fine Art

Since my last review was pretty undeniably glowing, I figured this month I’d share what I believe to be one of my least favorite galleries by far.

Now, before I start I’m with the negatives, it really wasn’t all bad. The receptionists were polished, the art was colorful, and there were some places to sit. Unfortunately, that didn’t do much to change my overall opinion of the gallery.

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Carstens’ Rejection of Academia

In late 18th century Europe, there weren’t many options available for artists looking to exhibit their work. You either painted in the style approved by the Salons and submitted to their juried shows, or you didn’t exhibit.

One artist, Asmus Jakob Carstens, decided that was too limiting, and that the popular artwork of that time had gone down the drain. He was appalled by the lack of reverence to the former masters and the recent shift from focusing on technical skill and draftsmanship to color without solid foundation.

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Monthly Gallery Review – The Wild Horses of Sable Island

After a month of wandering SoHo and Tribeca with my little black notebook, I’ve decided to use the multitude of notes that I’ve taken. Starting with July, every month I’ll introduce a new gallery that I either loved or had some major issues with.

This month, I’d love to talk about The Wild Horses of Sable Island. A permanent exhibit comprised of a selection of Canadian fashion photographer Roberto Dutesco’s personal work. The building itself is light and welcoming, with incredible friendly staff that are clearly excited about the photographs and the history of the Island.

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Bosch

Hieronymus Bosch is a fascinating character, something I’m sure you can agree with if you’ve seen any of his work- or even his given name. El Bosco, as he was known after relocating to Spain, had an incredibly rich imagination fitted with fantastical creatures, hellish landscapes, and bizarre inventions that defy description.

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